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Burgermania

A report notes that the French have fallen in love with the humble burger: only difference is that a burger Francaise is made to the highest standards, as is our TMix+ model! 

When Andrew Demetriou was the head of the AFL (2003-14), he would note every year that the period between June and July was when the umpires and the Laws of the Game would come under intense scrutiny—from the media and talkback. The order of the criticism would alternate, but was always loud.

Well, it seems that March each year is that time when the world gets into a tizz about the invasion of the burger into the French culture.

This week London’s Daily Telegraph (with a brief reference in The Age) reported that “French culinary credibility is at stake as hamburger becomes nation’s favourite snack.”

This is where Google comes in handy. Looking for the details on the net, I discovered another article—from the same newspaper—this one from March 2016. It claimed: “Le burger is now top selling dish in French restaurants, new study claims”.

Although the articles were all but identical their emphasis, what was clear that the numbers were rising: in 2016, the survey, as quoted by The Telegraph, suggested France’s population of nigh on 65 million had munched on 1.19 billion hamburgers; this year the number is 1.5 billion. To put some perspective on those large numbers, that’s 29 purchased burgers per person per year, or one every two weeks.

Before we start believing that this bastion of food culture is descending to rack and ruin, the survey claims that these numbers are not all to do with fast food outlets, but that “burgers…now figure on the menus of 85 per cent of the country’s restaurants”.

The results of the latest survey of burger consumption in France would come as no surprise to readers of TMix+: in last year’s Winter/Spring edition, when our head cook, Yolaine Corbin wrote: 

“High-end burger restaurants seem to have grown overnight, like mushrooms. And, judging by the snaking queue at the front of Big Fernand in my home town of Orléans, it is clear that trend is here to stay!

“Big Fernand’s concept is indeed a recipe for success: an à la Française gastronomic burger…made with fresh produce, home-made buns and local, ethically grown meat minced to order.”

Yolaine then went about creating her own burger recipe (below, with photo above), while stressing that the quality of the burger is not all about the mince, or the mixture, or the addition of cheese or beetroot slices (and Aussie special), or gherkins, or mustard, or ketchup—the quality and softness of the bun is fundamental. Yolaine being Yolaine, she created a special recipe for the bun (also below).

 
When Andrew Demetriou was the head of the AFL (2003-14), he would note every year that the period between June and July was when the umpires and the Laws of the Game would come under intense scrutiny—from the media and talkback. The order of the criticism would alternate, but was always loud.

Well, it seems that March each year is that time when the world gets into a tizz about the invasion of the burger into the French culture.

This week London’s Daily Telegraph (with a brief reference in The Age) reported that “French culinary credibility is at stake as hamburger becomes nation’s favourite snack.”

This is where Google comes in handy. Looking for the details on the net, I discovered another article—from the same newspaper—this one from March 2016. It claimed: “Le burger is now top selling dish in French restaurants, new study claims”.

Although the articles were all but identical their emphasis, what was clear that the numbers were rising: in 2016, the survey, as quoted by The Telegraph, suggested France’s population of nigh on 65 million had munched on 1.19 billion hamburgers; this year the number is 1.5 billion. To put some perspective on those large numbers, that’s 29 purchased burgers per person per year, or one every two weeks.

Before we start believing that this bastion of food culture is descending to rack and ruin, the survey claims that these numbers are not all to do with fast food outlets, but that “burgers…now figure on the menus of 85 per cent of the country’s restaurants”.

The results of the latest survey of burger consumption in France would come as no surprise to readers of TMix+: in last year’s Winter/Spring edition, when our head cook, Yolaine Corbin wrote: 

“High-end burger restaurants seem to have grown overnight, like mushrooms. And, judging by the snaking queue at the front of Big Fernand in my home town of Orléans, it is clear that trend is here to stay!

“Big Fernand’s concept is indeed a recipe for success: an à la Française gastronomic burger…made with fresh produce, home-made buns and local, ethically grown meat minced to order.”

Yolaine then went about creating her own burger recipe (below, with photo above), while stressing that the quality of the burger is not all about the mince, or the mixture, or the addition of cheese or beetroot slices (and Aussie special), or gherkins, or mustard, or ketchup—the quality and softness of the bun is fundamental. Yolaine being Yolaine, she created a special recipe for the bun (also below).

If you missed this issue, you can get back copies of all our editions at Thermomix Online Store. Just follow the prompts. 

Yolaine's burger

PATTIES
1 shallot
3 sprigs flat leaf parsley, leaves only
500 grams porterhouse steak,  cut into 3-centimetre chunks and  semi-frozen for 1.5 hours
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon sea salt
cracked pepper, to taste

BURGER MAYO
2 egg yolks
1 teaspoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 pinch ground white pepper
250 grams grapeseed, canola  or vegetable oil
2 teaspoons tomato ketchup or  1 teaspoon tomato paste

TO SERVE

4 hamburger buns (below), cut into halves lengthways
8 oak lettuce leaves
pickled cucumber 
8 slices Gouda cheese

  1. For the burger mayonnaise, in a clean and dry bowl, place the egg yolks, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper and whip 1 minute/37 degrees/speed 4. With the blades running on  2 minutes 30 seconds/speed 4, slowly drizzle the oil through the hole of the mixing bowl  lid to emulsify. Add a teaspoon of ketchup or half a teaspoon of tomato paste then mix 10 seconds/speed 4. Refrigerate until needed.
  2. For the patties, place the half the shallot and half the parsley leaves in the mixing bowl  and chop 3 seconds/speed 7. Scrape down sides of mixing bowl, add 250 grams of  semi-frozen meat and half the quantity of the remaining ingredients and mince Turbo/0.5 second/7–8 times.
  3. Shape into 2 thick, round patties. Repeat Step 2 with the second half of the ingredients.
  4. Cook the patties in the frying pan or on the barbecue to your liking; when you flip them over, place a slice of cheese over the cooked part so it starts melting.
  5. Spread burger mayo on both sides of the burger bread; on the bottom bread, arrange  2 leaves of lettuce, followed by a slice of cheese, then the beef burger topped with the  semi-melted slice of cheese and finish with slices of pickled cucumber. Close the burger  and secure by inserting a skewer or a steak knife in the centre.
  6. Enjoy immediately.

The Buns

270 grams milk
2 teaspoons dried yeast or 20 grams fresh yeast
1 teaspoon raw sugar
500 grams baker’s flour
2 teaspoons natural bread improver
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 egg
50 grams butter, at room temperature

TOPPING
milk to brush
3 teaspoons sesame seeds

  1. Place the milk, yeast and sugar in the mixing bowl and warm 2 minutes 30 seconds/40 degrees/speed 1. Keep the lid on and allow the mixture to start foaming for 10 minutes.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and mix 10 seconds/speed 5; then knead for 6 minutes/Knead.
  3. Transfer the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with cling film and prove in a warm place until doubled in size (about 1 hour).
  4. Knock down the dough on a floured bench top and divide into 6 pieces of approx. 150 grams each.
  5. Shape into balls and flatten them onto a baking tray lined with silicone paper. Cover loosely with cling film and prove again in a warm spot for 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  6. Preheat oven to 200C.
  7.  Just before baking, gently brush the surface of each bun with some milk and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake 10 minutes at 200C then turn the oven down to 170C and bake for a further 5 minutes.
  8. As soon as the buns come out, cover them with a clean and dry tea towel for 15 minutes; this will give them a lovely soft crust. AND… We recommend the Simply No Knead natural bread improver for this recipe.


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